Tourism

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Visitor Services


Visitor Information Centre
Phone: 306-236-4447 (June - August)

The Visitor Information Centre is open seasonally from June through August and is located just off Highway 4 at the south entrance to the City. The visitor centre also shares a building with the local Chamber of Commerce and Museum Society. Call or stop by and our friendly staff will be pleased to assist you.

The Meadow Lake Museum features items of interest from our pioneers' lives, and a look at the development of forestry in our area. In 2016, a new outdoor expansion was added to house the growing collection.

Local Events & Activities  

Check out our Community Calendar for information on upcoming events. 

Regional Attractions 

Meadow Lake is the gateway to the north, just a short drive away from the beautiful Meadow Lake Provincial Park and other outdoor recreation areas. The northwest region of Saskatchewan offers a spectacular variety of recreational attractions. The local parkland, with its many small lakes, is ideal for cottage vacations and camping, while the northern forest areas feature great fishing and hunting, and some of the most beautiful scenery in Canada. Year round, there is always somewhere to explore.
 

The Meadow Lake Provincial Park is one of Saskatchewan's most popular destinations. It covers 1,600 square kilometres and features two dozen lakes that are linked together by the Waterhen River. The lakes are fished for northern pike, walleye, and lake trout.

Wildlife: The clear lakes, and the forests of aspen, birch, jackpine and spruce, create a diverse natural habitat for 130 bird species (such as pelicans, bald eagles, golden eagles, and blue herons) and a range of animals from beaver, coyotes and wolves, to moose, elk, whitetail dear and black bear.

All-Season: Although it's the place to be in summer, Meadow Lake Provincial Park also offers fine winter activities such as cross country skiing, snow shoeing, snowmobiling and ice fishing.

Beaches: There are seven that are designated as swimming beaches. Red Cross swimming courses are offered.

Venues: Miniature golf. Tennis courts. Baseball diamonds. Playgrounds. Riding stables. Special park programs. Check the park bulletin boards to find out about all the good things going on.

Boating: Many lakes have boat launches. More remote lakes require a short portage. Canoe trips vary from a few hours to several days. Sail board, boat and canoe rentals are available.

Hiking: There are many nature trails throughout the park. Venture off on your own, or join the park staff on a guided tour.

Camping: Electrified sites, group camping, service centres with showers, and picnic areas.

Northwest Saskatchewan Parks

Sask Tourism

The Provincial Government's tourism information website.

Sask Parks

Saskatchewan Parks website.

Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management

The Provincial Government's department responsible for parks.

Makwa Lake Provincial Park

The Makwa Lake Provincial Park has land that adjoins five lakes. The park offers choice camping, ranging from sites with electricity, showers, flush toilets, and service centres, to sites that allow you to "rough it". As well, group camping can be arranged.

Canoes and power boats are available for rent, and the nearby village of Loon Lake provides ample services. There is also a nine-hole grass green golf course, and horseback riding or wagon riding for entertainment.

Steel Narrows and Fort Pitt  

Located in the area are the historically significant locations of Steele Narrows and Fort Pitt. Steele Narrows was the site of the last battle in the North West Rebellion of 1885. Fort Pitt is the site of an early Hudson's Bay Company fur trading post. There are Provincial Historic Parks at both locations offering picnic areas and fishing.